Thursday, March 05, 2020

Healthy books for Unhealthy times (Coronavirus)

A few books about health and health practices

Books for teachers/school health personnel
Germbusters: A handwashing activity book for primary grades 
 CMC RA777.C67 1986

Comprehensive School Health Education: Totally Awesome Strategies 
for Teaching Health
CMC RA440 .M43 2011



Books for preschool/primary grades
Alda, Arlene             Iris has a virus 
 Juv.A3571i

Cooke, Marjorie       Ten potato scrub: a counting book for handwashing 
 Juv. 613.C773t

Ferrin, Wendy           Germs on their fingers/Germanes en tus manos 
 Juv.613.4.F392g

Murphy, Liz               ABC Doctor: Staying Healthy from A to Z 
 Juv.618.02.M978a

Rabe, Tish                    Oh the things that you can do, that are good for you 
 Juv. 613. R114o

Verdick, Elizabeth           Germs are not for sharing 
 Juv. 613.V484g


Books for elementary grades
Murphy, Liz                       ABC Doctor: Staying Healthy from A to Z
Juv.618.02.M978a

Ziefert, Harriet                 You can’t take your body to a repair shop:
                                          a book about what makes you sick
Juv. 618.92.Z654


Books for Middle/High School


Diamond, Judy et.al. World of Viruses
(World of Viruses is a graphic novel that contains the thrilling true stories of well-known threats like foot and mouth disease, HIV, the flu, and HPV, as well as the lesser-known but helpful role that viruses play in saving global ecosystems from out-of-control blooms of algae.)
Juv.W9275

Friday, February 21, 2020

Banned Books in Canada 2016




Freedom to Read Week  in Canada
February 23-29,2020


30 Challenged Publications
https://www.freedomtoread.ca/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/30-challenged-publications-6-

Some titles:
Go Ask Alice /Anonymous
In 1978, school boards in Richmond and Langley, B.C., removed this book from their high schools. Go Ask Alice, which reads like a diary, describes a teenage girl’s experiences with narcotics and sex. In Richmond, students sent a petition to the school board to protest the ban, and the Richmond Teacher-Librarians’ Association supported them. In Langley, a committee of school trustees, librarians and parents recommended keeping copies in school counsellors’ offices. But these efforts failed; both bans stayed in effect.

To Kill a Mockingbird/Harper Lee
In 1991, an African-Canadian organization called PRUDE (Pride of Race, Unity and Dignity through Education) in Saint John, N.B., sought to remove Lee’s Pulitzer Prize–winning novel and Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from school reading lists. PRUDE disliked the portrayal of racial minorities in both novels.

Of Mice and Men/ John Steinbeck
 In 1994, in Alberta’s legislature, Victor Doerksen called for the removal of profane, irreligious books from Alberta’s schools. He cited Steinbeck’s novel, which describes the hardships of migrant workers in California during the Great Depression, as an example. Doerksen had a petition that bore the signatures of 811 Albertans who wanted schools to withdraw books that “demean or profane the name of God and Jesus Christ.”

Asha’s Mums/ Rosamund Elwin and Michele Paulse
 In 1997, school trustees in Surrey, B.C., banned the use in the elementary grades of children’s storybooks that depict same-sex parents. One of the banned titles was Asha’s Mums. A teacher, James Chamberlain, challenged the ban in court. In 2002, the Supreme Court of Canada declared that B.C.’s School Act required secular and non-discriminatory education. A ban on books about same-sex parents could not be legally justified.

The Harry Potter Series / J.K. Rowling
In 2000, a Christian parent in Corner Brook, Nfld., complained about the presence of these popular fantasy novels in an elementary school. The parent objected to the depiction of wizardry and magic, and the school principal ordered the books’ removal. Neither the parent nor the principal had read the novels

The Golden Compass /Philip Pullman 
In 2007, Ontario’s Halton Catholic District School Board voted to ban Philip Pullman’s trilogy of fantasy novels—The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife and The Amber Spyglass— from its schools. The board objected to “atheist” themes in the British author’s books.

The Handmaid’s Tale /Margaret Atwood
In 2008, a parent in Toronto complained about the use of this dystopian novel in his son’s Grade 12 English class. The Handmaid’s Tale tells the story of Offred, a woman who lives in a future patriarchal theocracy. The parent disliked the novel’s “profane language,” anti-Christian overtones and themes of “violence” and “sexual degradation.” In 2009, a review panel of the Toronto District School Board recommended that the novel be kept in the curricula for Grades 11 and 12. The Handmaid’s Tale remained on Grade 12 reading lists.

Three Wishes: Palestinian and Israeli Children Speak /Deborah Ellis
In 2006, the Ontario branch of the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) objected to the inclusion of this nonfiction book in a voluntary reading program in Grades 4–6 of Ontario’s schools. In Three Wishes, children speak frankly about the strife around them in Palestine and Israel. Concerned about the “toxic effects” of the book on students’ minds, the CJC urged school boards to withdraw Three Wishes from the reading program. At least five school boards restricted or denied access to the book.

2016 List of Challenged Materials
http://cfla-fcab.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2017-challenges-survey-bpc-titles-and-policies.pdf

Lists of Previously Challenged Materials (2006-2016)
http://cfla-fcab.ca/en/programs/intellectual-freedom-challenges-survey/

Thursday, February 13, 2020

All white world of children's books question continues with the 2019 Diversity Baseline Survey

Recently Lee and Low published their 2019 Diversity Baseline Survey results on diversity in the publishing industry. The Diversity Baseline Survey (DBS 2.0) was created by Lee & Low Books with co-authors Laura M. Jiménez, PhD, Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development and Betsy Beckert, graduate student in the Language and Literacy Department of Wheelock College of Education & Human Development.

They first created a baseline study in 2015.This study was authored by Sarah Park Dahlen, PhD, St.  Catherine University and Nicole Catlin, graduate student, St. Catherine University.


Unfortunately,even with a bigger response rate, the survey results' numbers reveal an industry, sales force, and book review staff that is overwhelmingly White, Cisgender, Straight and Non-Disabled.  The issue of the All White World of Children's Books remains.


See also 

https://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2014/05/all-white-world-of-childrens-books.html
http://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2014/04/all-white-world-of-childrens-books.html
http://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2014/03/all-white-world-of-childrens-books.html
http://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2013/06/all-white-world-of-childrens-books.html

Monday, February 10, 2020

Student Driven Awards- Cook Prize Finalists

From the Bank Street College of Education:

https://www.bankstreet.edu/library/center-for-childrens-literature/the-cook-prize/?mc_cid=b4c80bdafc&mc_eid=9969a1f01f

The Bank Street Center for Children's Literature 
Is Delighted
 to Announce the Candidates 
for the 2020 Cook Prize 
for Best STEM Picture Book of the Year!


The Candidates are:

Flower Talk: How Plants Use Color to Communicate  by Sara Levine; illustrated by Masha D’Yans  (Millbrook Press: A Division of Lerner Publishing Group)

Hedy Lamarr's Double Life by Laurie Wallmark; illustrated by Katy Wu (Sterling Children’s Books)

Mario and the Hole in the Sky: How a Chemist Saved Our Planet by Elizabeth Rusch; illustrated by Teresa Martínez (Charlesbridge)

Secret Engineer: How Emily Roebling Built the Brooklyn Bridge, by Rachel Dougherty (Roaring Brook Press)


If you have not already done so, you can use the red tab below to register your classes to participate in the selection process.  Votes will be due by April 22, 2020.



Note the list of finalists for the Irma Black Award will be sent in mid-February. Use this link to register your classes.  




Monday, January 27, 2020

ALA Youth Media 2020 Award List

From  http://ala.unikron.com/YMA%202020%20Wrap%20Release%20FINAL.pdf

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature:
 “New Kid,”  (Juv..C8856n) written by Jerry Craft, is the 2020 Newbery Medal winner. The book is illustrated by the author and published by HarperCollins Children’s Books, a division of HarperCollins Publishers.

Four Newbery Honor Books also were named:
 “The Undefeated,” written by Kwame Alexander, illustrated by Kadir Nelson and published by Versify, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt;

“Scary Stories for Young Foxes,” written by Christian McKay Heidicker, illustrated by Junyi Wu and published by Henry Holt and Company, an imprint of Macmillan Publishing Group;

“Other Words for Home,” written by Jasmine Warga and published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; and

“Genesis Begins Again,” written by Alicia D. Williams and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book. 

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:
“The Undefeated,” illustrated by Kadir Nelson is the 2020 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was written by Kwame Alexander and published by Versify, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Three Caldecott Honor Books also were named:
 “Bear Came Along,” illustrated by LeUyen Pham, written by Richard T. Morris and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group;

“Double Bass Blues,” illustrated by Rudy Gutierrez, written by Andrea J. Loney and published by Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC; and

“Going Down Home with Daddy,” illustrated by Daniel Minter, written by Kelly Starling Lyons and published by Peachtree Publishers.

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African-American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

 “New Kid” ( Juv. C8856n) written by Jerry Craft, is the King Author Book winner. The book is illustrated by the author and published by HarperCollins Children’s Books, a division of HarperCollins Publishers.

Three King Author Honor Books were selected:

“The Stars and the Blackness Between Them,” written by Junauda Petrus and published by Dutton Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC;

“Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky,” written by Kwame Mbalia and published by Disney-Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group; and “

Look Both Ways: A Tale Told in Ten Blocks,” written by Jason Reynolds and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book.

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:

“The Undefeated,” illustrated by Kadir Nelson, is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book is written by Kwame Alexander and published by Versify, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Three King Illustrator Honor Books were selected:

“The Bell Rang,” illustrated by James E. Ransome, written by the illustrator and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book;

 “Infinite Hope: A Black Artist’s Journey from World War II to Peace,” illustrated by Ashley Bryan, written by the illustrator and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book; and

“Sulwe,” illustrated by Vashti Harrison, written by Lupita Nyong’o and published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award:

 “Genesis Begins Again,” written by Alicia D. Williams, is the Steptoe author award winner. The book is published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book.

 Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award:

 “What Is Given from the Heart,” illustrated by April Harrison, is the Steptoe illustrator award winner. The book is written by Patricia C. McKissack and published by Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement:

Mildred D. Taylor is the winner of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton. Born in Mississippi in 1943 and raised in Ohio, Taylor resides in Colorado. “Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry” won the 1977 Newbery Award and a Coretta Scott King Book Award honor. Taylor received the international 2003 inaugural NSK Neustadt Prize for Children's Literature. Her books earned national recognition including four CSK author awards and two author honors. Her 2020 Logan family series conclusion “All the Days Past, All the Days to Come” continues addressing systemic injustice, entrenched inequality and the roots of racism.

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults:

 “Dig,” written by A.S. King, is the 2020 Printz Award winner. The book is published by Dutton Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House.

 Four Printz Honor Books also were named:
“The Beast Player,” written by Nahoko Uehashi, translated by Cathy Hirano and published by Godwin Books/Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group;

 “Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me,” written by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Rosemary Valero-O’Connell and published by First Second/Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group;

“Ordinary Hazards: A Memoir,” written by Nikki Grimes and published by Wordsong, an imprint of Boyds Mills & Kane; and

“Where the World Ends,” written by Geraldine McCaughrean and published by Flatiron Books, an imprint of Macmillan Publishers.

 Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:

 “Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You,” written by Sonia Sotomayor, illustrated by Rafael López and published by Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, wins the award for young children (ages 0 to 10).

One honor book for Young Children was selected:

 “A Friend for Henry,” written by Jenn Bailey, illustrated by Mika Song and published by Chronicle Books LLC.

“Song for a Whale,” written by Lynne Kelly and published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Book, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, is the winner for middle grades (ages 11-13).

One honor book for middle grades was selected: “Each Tiny Spark,” written by Pablo Cartaya and published by Kokila Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.

“Cursed,” written by Karol Ruth Silverstein and published by Charlesbridge, is the winner for teens (ages 13-18).

 One honor book for teens was selected: “The Silence Between Us,” written by Alison Gervais and published by Blink.

Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences: “A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World,” By C.A. Fletcher, Published by Orbit, a division of Hachette Group “Do You Dream of Terra-Two?” By Temi Oh, Published by Saga Press/Gallery Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc. “Dominicana,” By Angie Cruz, Published by Flatiron Books, an imprint of Macmillan Publishers “Gender Queer: A Memoir,” By Maia Kobabe, Published by Lion Forge, an imprint of Oni Press “High School,” By Sara Quin and Tegan Quin, Published by MCD, a division of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, an imprint of Macmillan Publishers “In Waves,” By AJ Dungo, Published by Nobrow “Middlegame,” By Seanan McGuire, Published by Tor.com Publishing, an imprint of Tom Doherty Associates, a division of Macmillan “The Nickel Boys,” By Colson Whitehead, Published by Doubleday, a division of Penguin Random House “Red, White & Royal Blue” By Casey McQuiston, Published by St. Martin’s Griffin, a division of St. Martin’s Publishing Group, an imprint of Macmillan Publishers “The Swallows,” By Lisa Lutz, Published by Ballantine Books, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House

Children’s Literature Legacy Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children through books that demonstrate integrity and respect for all children’s lives and experiences. The 2020 winner is Kevin Henkes, whose award-winning works include “Kitten’s First Full Moon” which won the Caldecott Award in 2005 and “The Year of Billy Miller,” recipient of a Newbery Honor in 2014. In addition, Henkes has received two Geisel honors, two Caldecott honors and a second Newbery honor.

 Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults: The 2020 winner is Steve Sheinkin. His books include: “Bomb: The Race to Build-and Steal-the World's Most Dangerous Weapon,” “The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights,” and “The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story of Adventure, Heroism, & Treachery,” all published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group, and “Lincoln's Grave Robbers,” published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.

2020 ALSC Children’s Literature Lecture Award recognizing an author, critic, librarian, historian or teacher of children's literature, who then presents a lecture at a winning host site. Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop will deliver the 2021 Children’s Literature Lecture. Dr. Sims Bishop, Professor Emerita at The Ohio State University, has served on numerous noteworthy committees for ALA and other organizations, and has been recognized with prestigious awards for her work. Her research, writing, and teaching have informed and expanded conversations about representation of African Americans in children's literature and provided a critical framework for research and pedagogy. Her essay, "Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors," is not only cited globally, it has inspired shifts in publishing, teaching, and the inclusion of authentic, diverse voices in literature for children and teens.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States, and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States:

“Brown” is the 2020 Batchelder Award winner. Originally published in Norwegian as “Brune,” the book was written by Håkon Øvreås, illustrated by Øyvind Torseter, translated by Kari Dickson and published by Enchanted Lion Books.

Four Honor Books also were selected: “The Beast Player,” published by Godwin Books/Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group, written by Nahoko Uehashi, illustrated by Yuta Onoda and translated from the Japanese by Cathy Hirano;

 “The Distance Between Me and the Cherry Tree,” published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, written by Paola Peretti, illustrated by Carolina Rabei, translated from the Italian by Denise Muir;

“Do Fish Sleep?” published by Enchanted Lion Books, written by Jens Raschke, illustrated by Jens Rassmus, translated from the German by Belinda Cooper; and

 “When Spring Comes to the DMZ,” published by Plough Publishing House, written by Uk-Bae Lee, illustrated by the author, translated from the Korean by Chungyon Won and Aileen Won.

Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States: “Hey, Kiddo: How I Lost My Mother, Found My Father, and Dealt with Family Addiction,” produced by Scholastic Audiobooks, is the 2020 Odyssey Award winner. The book is written by Jarrett J. Krosoczka and narrated by the author, Jeanne Birdsall, Jenna Lamia, Richard Ferrone and a full cast. Four Odyssey Honor Audiobooks also were selected: “Redwood and Ponytail,” produced by Hachette Audio, written by K.A. Holt and narrated by Cassandra Morris and Tessa Netting; “Song for a Whale,” produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, written by Lynne Kelly and narrated by Abigail Revasch with the author; “We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga,” produced by Live Oak Media, written by Traci Sorell and narrated by Lauren Hummingbird, Agalisiga (Choogie) Mackey, Ryan Mackey, Traci Sorell, Tonia Weavel; “We’re Not from Here,” produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, written by Geoff Rodkey and narrated by Dani Martineck.

Pura Belpré Awards honoring a Latino writer and illustrator whose children's books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:

“Dancing Hands: How Teresa Carreño Played the Piano for President Lincoln,” illustrated by Rafael López, is the Belpré Illustrator Award winner. The book was written by Margarita Engle and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

Three Belpré Illustrator Honor Books were named:

"Across the Bay,” illustrated by Carlos Aponte, written by the illustrator and published by Penguin Workshop, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC;

 "My Papi Has a Motorcycle," illustrated by Zeke Peña, written by Isabel Quintero and published by Kokila, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC; and

"¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market," illustrated by Raúl Gonzalez, written by the author and published by Versify, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

“Sal and Gabi Break the Universe,” written by Carlos Hernandez, is the Pura Belpré Author Award winner. The book is published by Disney-Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group.

Four Belpré Author Honor Books was named:

 "Lety Out Loud," written by Angela Cervantes and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.;

"The Other Half of Happy," written by Rebecca Balcárcel and published by Chronicle Books;

"Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpré,"( Juv.920 .B452d) written by Anika Aldamuy Denise, illustrated by Paola Escobar and published by HarperCollins Children’s Books, a division of HarperCollins Publishers; and

 "Soldier for Equality: José de la Luz Sáenz and the Great War," written by Duncan Tonatiuh, illustrated by the author and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:

“Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story,” written by Kevin Noble Maillard and illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal, is the Sibert Award winner. The book is published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings.

Four Sibert Honor Books were named:
"All in a Drop: How Antony van Leeuwenhoek Discovered an Invisible World," written by Lori Alexander, illustrated by Vivien Mildenberger and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt;

"This Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality," written by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy and published by Bloomsbury Children's Books;

"Ordinary Hazards: A Memoir," written by Nikki Grimes and published by WordSong, an imprint of Highlights; and

"Hey, Water!" written and illustrated by Antoinette Portis and published by Neal Porter Books, Holiday House.

The Excellence in Early Learning Digital Media Award is given to a digital media producer that has created distinguished digital media for an early learning audience. The 2020 in Early Learning Digital Media Award winner is Molly of Denali, produced by PBS Kids. The committee selected two honor recipients including “Seek," produced by iNaturalist, and “States of Matter by Tinybop,” produced by Tinybop, Inc.

Stonewall Book Award - Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience:

“When Aidan Became a Brother,” written by Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita and published by Lee & Low Books Inc. and

“The Black Flamingo,” written by Dean Atta, illustrated by Anshika Khullar and published by Hodder Children’s Books, an imprint of Hachette Children’s Group, part of Hodder and Stoughton are the 2020 recipients of the Stonewall Book Awards – Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award.

 Three Honor Books were selected:

 “Pet,” written by Akwaeke Emezi and published by Make Me a World, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC;

“Like a Love Story,” written by Abdi Nazemian and published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, and

“The Best at It,” written by Maulik Pancholy and published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book is:

 “Stop! Bot!” written and illustrated by James Yang. The book is published by Viking, Penguin Young Readers.

Three Geisel Honor Books were named:

“Chick and Brain: Smell My Foot!” written and illustrated by Cece Bell and published by Candlewick Press;

“Flubby Is Not a Good Pet!” written and illustrated by J. E. Morris and published by Penguin Workshop, an imprint of Penguin Random House; and

“The Book Hog,” written and illustrated by Greg Pizzoli and published by Disney-Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group.

William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens:

“The Field Guide to the North American Teenager,” written by Ben Philippe, is the 2020 Morris Award winner. The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Four other books were finalists for the award:

“The Candle and the Flame,” written by Nafiza Azad and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic;

“Frankly in Love,” written by David Yoon and published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House;

“Genesis Begins Again,” written by Alicia D. Williams and published by Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing; and

“There Will Come a Darkness,” written by Katy Rose Pool and published by Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults:

“Free Lunch,” written by Rex Ogle, is the 2020 Excellence winner. The book is published by Norton Young Readers, an imprint of W.W. Norton & Company.

Four other books were finalists for the award:

"The Great Nijinsky: God of Dance," written and illustrated by Lynn Curlee and published by Charlesbridge Teen;

 "A Light in the Darkness: Janusz Korczak, His Orphans, and the Holocaust," written by Albert Marrin and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House;

 "A Thousand Sisters: The Heroic Airwomen of the Soviet Union in World War II," written by Elizabeth Wein and published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; and

"Torpedoed: The True Story of the World War II Sinking of 'The Children's Ship'," written by Deborah Heiligman and published by Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature. The award promotes Asian/Pacific American culture and heritage and is awarded based on literary and artistic merit. The award offers three youth categories including Picture Book, Children’s Literature and Young Adult Literature. The award is administered by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association.

This year’s winners include:

The Picture Book winner is “Queen of Physics: How Wu Chien Shiung Helped Unlock the Secrets of the Atom,” written by Teresa Robeson, illustrated by Rebecca Huang and published by Sterling Children's Books.

The committee selected one Picture Book honor title: “Bilal Cooks Daal,” written by Aisha Saeed, illustrated by Anoosha Syed and published by Salaam Reads/Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing.

The Children’s Literature winner is

“Stargazing,” written by Jen Wang and published by First Second, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group.

The committee selected one children’s literature honor title:

“I’m Ok,” written by Patti Kim and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing.

The Young Adult Literature winner is “They Called Us Enemy,” written by George Takei, Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, illustrated by Harmony Becker and published by Top Shelf Productions, an imprint of IDW Publishing.

The committee selected one Young Adult Literature honor title: “Frankly in Love,” written by David Yoon and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

The Sydney Taylor Book Award is presented annually to outstanding books for children and teens that authentically portray the Jewish experience. Presented by the Association of Jewish Libraries since 1968, the award encourages the publication and widespread use of quality Judaic literature. This year’s winners include:

The Picture Book winner is

“The Book Rescuer: How a Mensch from Massachusetts Saved Yiddish Literature for Generations to Come,” by Sue Macy, illustrated by Stacy Innerst and published by Paula Wiseman Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster.

Two Picture Book honor books were selected:

“Gittel’s Journey,” by Lesléa Newman, illustrated by Amy June Bates and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, and

“The Key from Spain: Flory Jagoda and Her Music,” by Debbie Levy, illustrated by Sonja Wimmer and published by Kar-Ben Publishing, a division of Lerner Publishing Group.

The Middle Grade winner is “White Bird: A Wonder Story,” by R. J. Palacio and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

Two Middle Grade honor books were selected:

 “Anya and the Dragon,” by Sofiya Pasternack and published by Versify, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and “

Games of Deception: The True Story of the First U.S. Olympic Basketball Team at the 1936 Olympics in Hitler’s Germany,” by Andrew Maraniss and published by Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

The Young Adult winner is

“Someday We Will Fly,” by Rachel DeWoskin and published by Viking Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

 Two Young Adult honor books were selected:

“Dissenter on the Bench: Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Life and Work,” by Victoria Ortiz and published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and

“Sick Kids in Love,” by Hannah Moskowitz and published by Entangled Teen, an imprint of Entangled Publishing LLC.

The American Indian Youth Literature Award is announced in even years and established to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians. The award is administered by the American Indian Library Association (AILA), an affiliate of the American Library Association. Additional information regarding the American Indian Youth Literature Award is available at ailanet.org.

This year’s winners include:

 The Picture Book winner is “Bowwow Powwow: Bagosenjige-niimi’idim,” written by Brenda J. Child (Red Lake Ojibwe), translated into Ojibwe by Gordon Jourdain (Lac La Croix First Nation), illustrated by Jonathan Thunder (Red Lake Ojibwe) and published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.

The committee selected five Picture Book Honor titles including:

“Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story,” ( Juv.M2195f) written by Kevin Noble Maillard (Seminole Nation, Mekusukey Band), illustrated by Juana Martínez-Neal (Peruvian-American) and published by Roaring Brook Press / Macmillan;

“Birdsong,” written and illustrated by Julie Flett (Cree-Métis) and published by Greystone Kids; “At the Mountain’s Base,” written by Traci Sorell (Cherokee), illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre (Tongva/Scots-Gaelic), and published by Kokila / Penguin Random House;

“We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga,” ( Juv..S7134w) written by Traci Sorell (Cherokee), illustrated by Frané Lessac, and published by Charlesbridge; and

“Raven Makes the Aleutians,” adapted from a traditional Tlingit story and illustrated by Janine Gibbons (Haida, Raven of the Double-Finned Killer Whale clan, Brown Bear House) and published by Sealaska Heritage.

The Middle Grade Book winner is “Indian No More,” written by Charlene Willing McManis (Umpqua/Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde) with Traci Sorell (Cherokee), cover art by Marlena Myles (Spirit Lake Dakota, Mohegan, Muscogee Creek), published by Tu Books / Lee & Low.

 The committee selected two Middle Grade Book Honor titles including:

“I Can Make This Promise,” written by Christine Day (Upper Skagit), with cover art by Michaela Goade (Tlingit, Kiks.ádi clan, Steel House), published by HarperCollins; and

“The Grizzly Mother,” written by Hetxw’ms Gyetxw (“Brett D. Huson,” Gitxsan), illustrated by Natasha Donovan (Métis Nation of British Columbia), and published by Highwater Press.

The Young Adult Book winner is “Hearts Unbroken,” written by Cynthia Leitich Smith (Muscogee) and published by Candlewick Press.

The committee selected four Young Adult Book Honor titles including:

“Surviving the City,” written by Tasha Spillett (Nehiyaw-Trinidadian), illustrated by Natasha Donovan (Métis Nation of British Columbia), and published by Highwater Press;

“Reawakening Our Ancestors’ Lines: Revitalizing Inuit Traditional Tattooing,” gathered and compiled by Angela Hovak Johnston (Inuk), with photography by Cora De Vos (Inuk), published by Inhabit Media;

“An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People,” written by Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh) and Jean Mendoza adapted from the adult book by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, published by Beacon Press; and

 “Apple in the Middle,” written by Dawn Quigley (Ojibwe, Turtle Mountain Band) and published by North Dakota State University Press. Recognized worldwide

See also https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/blogs/the-scoop/2020-youth-media-award-winners/

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Youth Media Awards- January 27, 2020



Each year the American Library Association honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards, including the prestigious Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book Awards, guide parents, educators, librarians, and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media.
The 2020 Youth Media Award announcements will take place on Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, at 8 a.m. ET from the Pennsylvania Convention Center, in Philadelphia. Fans can follow the action live at http://ala.unikron.com , @AmericanLibraryAssociation or by following #ALAyma20 .

See https://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2020/01/ala-youtj-media-2020-award-list.html for winners list

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Student Driven Book Awards


From the Bank Street College of Education:

Teachers and Librarians!
Make Selection of Two Bank Street Children's Book Awards Part of Your Elementary Curriculum

 

Want your students to practice their reasoning, persuasive speaking, and sharpen their visual skills while participating in  selection of Bank Street’s Center for Children’s Literature’s annual best picture and best science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) books?

















First and Second Grade classes may participate in the selection of the Irma Simonton Black and James H. Black Award for Excellence in Children’s Literature (Irma Black Award). The award goes to an outstanding picture book for young children – a book in which text and illustrations are inseparable, each enhancing and enlarging on the other to produce a singular whole. The Irma Black Award is unusual in that children are the final judges of the winning book.


Learn more here about last year's award and the award curriculum. 

 Note we will send the 2020 voting link to new registrants in early spring.


















Third and Fourth Grade classes are invited to jury the Cook Prize.  The Cook Prize honors the best STEM book of the year published for children eight to ten. It is the only national children’s choice award honoring a STEM title.

Register here.

Learn more about last year's award and the award curriculum.  The 2020 voting link will be sent to registrants in  early spring. 

 
Previous Winners: