Thursday, March 21, 2019

Green Book Documentary

Learn more about the Green Book at the African Diaspora International Film Festival in New York City this weekend!

Discover the real story of the Green Book, the guide that changed how black people traveled in America. The new documentary, The Green Book: Guide to Freedom, looks at how the historic travel guide helped black motorists.  




The Green Book: Guide to Freedom – Q&A

Directed by Yoruba Richen
Click the link below  for information
https://nyadiff.org/spring-series-2019/movies/the-green-book-guide-to-freedom/ 


DATES & TIMES
Teachers College
Sat Mar 30
7:40 pm
535 Cathedral Parkway,
Suite 14B
New York, NY
10025
(212) 864-1760
info@nyadiff.org
See also the previous post on the subject:
http://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2019/01/the-green-book-movie-and-ruth-and-green.html

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

The Green Book (Movie) and Ruth and the Green Book


Although currently the movie, Green Book has had a lot of publicity Oscar  and Golden Globe buzz and a fair amount of controversy: 
  https://shadowandact.com/the-real-donald-shirley-green-book-hollywood-swallowed-whole            https://variety.com/2019/film/news/green-book-controversy-writer-nick-vallelonga-don-shirley-1203103114/


Nine years ago another book, Ruth and  the Green Book/ Calvin Alexander Ramsay (Juv..R1837r) introduced  the publication from a child's view. The notes in the back of the book  give the historical background. The author also has a website , https://greenbookchronicles.com/ with interviews and information about a play based on the book. 
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The New York Public Library has digitized editions of the Green Book that can be read online at https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/the-green-book#/?tab=about



ALA Youth Media Awards 2019-1/28/19


The 2019 Youth Media Award announcements took place on Monday, Jan. 28, 2019, at 8 a.m. PT from the Washington Convention Center, in Seattle, Washington. 

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature:

“Merci Suárez Changes Gears,” written by Meg Medina, is the 2019 Newbery Medal winner. The book is published by Candlewick Press.

Two Newbery Honor Books also were named: “The Night Diary,” written by Veera Hiranandani and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC; and “The Book of Boy,” written by Catherine Gilbert Murdock, illustrated by Ian Schoenherr and published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:
“Hello Lighthouse,” illustrated and written by Sophie Blackall is the 2019 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Four Caldecott Honor Books also were named: “Alma and How She Got Her Name,” illustrated and written by Juana Martinez-Neal and published by Candlewick Press; “A Big Mooncake for Little Star,” illustrated and written by Grace Lin and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.; “The Rough Patch,” illustrated and written by Brian Lies and published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; and “Thank You, Omu!” illustrated and written by Oge Mora and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African-American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults 
“A Few Red Drops: The Chicago Race Riot of 1919,” written by Claire Hartfield, is the King Author Book winner. The book is published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Three King Author Honor Books were selected: “Finding Langston,” written by Lesa Cline-Ransome and published by Holiday House; “The Parker Inheritance,” written by Varian Johnson and published by Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.; and “The Season of Styx Malone,” written by Kekla Magoon and published by Wendy Lamb Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.
Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award: “The Stuff of Stars,” illustrated by Ekua Holmes, is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book is written by Marion Dane Bauer and published by Candlewick Press. 

Three King Illustrator Honor Book were selected: “Hidden Figures,” illustrated by Laura Freeman, written by Margot Lee Shetterly and published by HarperCollins Children’s Books, a division of HarperCollins Publishers; “Let the Children March,” illustrated by Frank Morrison, written by Monica Clark-Robinson and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company; and “Memphis, Martin, and the Mountaintop,” illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, written by Alice Faye Duncan and published by Calkins Creek, an imprint of Highlights.
Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award: 
“Monday’s Not Coming,” written by Tiffany D. Jackson, is the Steptoe author award winner. The book is published by Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award: 

“Thank You, Omu!,” illustrated and written by Oge Mora and published by Little, Brown Young Readers. 
Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement: 

Dr. Pauletta Brown Bracy is the winner of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton.

Dr. Bracy is Professor of Library Science and Director of the Office of University Accreditation at North Carolina Central University (NCCU). She has successfully merged scholarship and service with publications such as “Libraries, Literacy and African American Youth” (co-edited with Sandra Hughes Hassell and Casey H. Rawson) as well as her work with the Coretta Scott King Book Awards and with workshops and conferences dedicated to promoting African American books for children and teens. She recently served as co-organizer for Celebrating Our Voices: Black Children’s Literature Symposium and Book Festival held at NCCU.
Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults
“The Poet X,” written by Elizabeth Acevedo, is the 2019 Printz Award winner. The book is published by HarperTeen, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Three Printz Honor Books also were named: “Damsel,” written by Elana K. Arnold and published by Balzer+Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; “A Heart in a Body in the World,” written by Deb Caletti and published by Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing; and “I, Claudia,” written by Mary McCoy and published by Carolrhoda Lab®, an imprint of Carolrhoda Books®, a division of Lerner Publishing Group.

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience

“Rescue & Jessica A Life-Changing Friendship,” written by Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes, illustrated by Scott Magoon and published by Candlewick Press, wins the award for young children (ages 0 to 10).

One honor book for young children was selected: “The Remember Balloons,” written by Jessie Oliveros, illustrated by Dana Wulfekotte and published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Children.

“The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle,” written by Leslie Connor and published by Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, is the winner for middle grades (ages 11-13).

One honor book for middle grades was selected:

“The Collectors,” written by Jacqueline West and published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

“Anger Is a Gift,” written by Mark Oshiro and published by A Tor Teen Book, Tom Doherty Associates, is the winner for teens (ages 13-18).

One honor book for teens was selected: “(Don’t) Call Me Crazy: 33 Voices Start the Conversation about Mental Health,” edited by Kelly Jensen and published by Algonquin Young Readers, an imprint of Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, a division of Workman Publishing.
Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences
“The Black God’s Drums,” By P. Djèlí Clark, Published by Tor.com, an imprint of Tom Doherty Associates, a division of Macmillan.

“The Book of Essie,” By Meghan MacLean Weir, Published by Knopf, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House.

“Circe,” By Madeline Miller, Published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group.

“Educated: A Memoir,” By Tara Westover, Published by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House.

“The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After,” By Clemantine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil, Published by Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House.

“Green,” By Sam Graham-Felsen, published by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House. “Home After Dark,” by David Small, illustrated by the author, published by Liveright, an imprint of W.W. Norton & Company. “How Long ’Til Black Future Month?” By N. K. Jemisin, Published by Orbit, an imprint of Hachette Book Group.

“Lawn Boy,” By Jonathan Evison, Published by Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, a division of Workman Publishing.

“Spinning Silver,” by Naomi Novik, published by Del Rey, a division of Penguin Random House.
Children’s Literature Legacy Award 
honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children through books that demonstrate integrity and respect for all children’s lives and experiences.
The 2019 winner is Walter Dean Myers, whose award-winning works include “Somewhere in the Darkness,” a 1993 Newbery Honor Book, and “Monster,” recipient of a 2000 Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book. In addition, Myers received the first Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2010.

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults
The 2019 winner is M.T. Anderson. His books include: “Feed;” “The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume I: The Pox Party;” and “The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II: The Kingdom on the Waves,” all published by Candlewick Press. 
2020 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award 
recognizing an author, critic, librarian, historian or teacher of children's literature, who then presents a lecture at a winning host site.

Neil Gaiman will deliver the 2020 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Born in England, Gaiman is a United States resident. His work has been honored with many awards internationally, including the Newbery Medal. He is credited with being one of the creators of modern comics, as well as an author whose work crosses genres and reaches audiences of all ages. Gaiman is a prolific creator of works of prose, poetry, film, journalism, comics, song lyrics, and drama and a vocal defender of the freedom to read.
Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States, and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States: 
“The Fox on the Swing” is the 2019 Batchelder Award winner. Originally published in Lithuanian as “Laime Yra Lape,” the book was written by Evelina Daciūtė, illustrated by Aušra Kiudulaitė, translated by The Translation Bureau and published by Thames & Hudson, Inc.

Four Honor Books also were selected:

“Run for Your Life,” published by Yonder, an imprint of Restless Books, Inc., written by Silvana Gandolfi and translated from the Italian by Lynne Sharon Schwartz; “My Beijing: Four Stories of Everyday Wonder,” published by Graphic Universe, a division of Lerner Publishing Group, Inc., written and illustrated by Nie Jun, originally published in Mandarin and translated from the French by Edward Gauvin; “Edison: The Mystery of the Missing Mouse Treasure,” published by NorthSouth Books, Inc., written and illustrated by Torben Kuhlmann and translated from the German by David Henry Wilson; and “Jerome By Heart,” published by Enchanted Lion Books, written by Thomas Scotto, illustrated by Olivier Tallec and translated from the French by Claudia Zoe Bedrick and Karin Snelson.
Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States:
“Sadie,” produced by Macmillan Audio from Wednesday Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press, is the 2019 Odyssey Award winner. The book is written by Courtney Summers and narrated by Rebecca Soler, Fred Berman, Dan Bittner, Gabra Zackman, and more.

Four books Odyssey Honor Audiobooks also were selected:

“Du Iz Tak” produced by Weston Woods Studio, a division of Scholastic, written by Carson Ellis and narrated by Eli and Sebastian D’Amico, Burton, Galen and Laura Fott, Sarah Hart, Bella Higginbotham, Evelyn Hipp and Brian Hull; “Esquivel! Space-Age Sound Artist,” produced by Live Oak Media, written by Susan Wood and narrated by Brian Amador; “The Parker Inheritance,” produced by Scholastic Audiobooks, written by Varian Johnson and narrated by Cherise Booth; and “The Poet X,” produced by HarperAudio, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers and written and narrated by Elizabeth Acevedo. 
Pura Belpré Awards honoring a Latinx writer and illustrator whose children's books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience
“Dreamers,” illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales, is the Belpré Illustrator Award winner. The book was published by Neal Porter Books, Holiday House Publishing, Inc.

Two Belpré Illustrator Honor Books were named:

“Islandborn,” illustrated by Leo Espinosa, written by Junot Díaz and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC; and “When Angels Sing: The Story of Rock Legend Carlos Santana,” illustrated by Jose Ramirez, written by Michael Mahin and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

"The Poet X,” written by Elizabeth Acevedo, is the Pura Belpré Author Award winner. The book is published by HarperTeen, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

One Belpré Author Honor Book was named: "They Call Me Güero: A Border Kid’s Poems," written by David Bowles and published by Cinco Puntos Press. 
Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:

“The Girl Who Drew Butterflies: How Maria Merian’s Art Changed Science,” written by Joyce Sidman, is the Sibert Award winner. The book is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Five Sibert Honor Books were named:

“Camp Panda: Helping Cubs Return to the Wild,” written by Catherine Thimmesh and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; “Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and The War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America,” written by Gail Jarrow and published by Calkins Creek, an imprint of Highlights; “The Unwanted: Stories of the Syrian Refugees,” written and illustrated by Don Brown and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; “We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga,” written by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Frané Lessac and published by Charlesbridge; and “When Angels Sing: The Story of Rock Legend Carlos Santana,” written Michael Mahin, illustrated by Jose Ramirez and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

The inaugural Excellence in Early Learning Digital Media Award is being given in 2019 to a digital media producer that has created distinguished digital media for an early learning audience. The 2019 in Early Learning Digital Media Award winner is Play and Learn Science, produced by PBS Kids. The committee selected two honor recipients including Coral Reef, produced by Tinybop Inc., and Lexi’s World, produced by Pop Pop Pop LLC.

Stonewall Book Award - Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult LiteratureAward given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience: “Julián Is a Mermaid,” written by Jessica Love and published by Candlewick Press, and “Hurricane Child,” written by Kheryn Callender and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., are the 2019 recipients of the Stonewall Book Awards – Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award, respectively. Two Honor Books were selected: “Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World,” written by Ashley Herring Blake and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.; and “Picture Us in the Light,” written by Kelly Loy Gilbert and published by Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group.
Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book is “Fox the Tiger,” written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor. The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. 
Four Geisel Honor Books were named: “The Adventures of Otto: See Pip Flap,” written and illustrated by David Milgrim and published by Simon Spotlight, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division; “Fox + Chick: The Party and Other Stories,” written and illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier and published by Chronicle Books LLC; “King & Kayla and the Case of the Lost Tooth,” written by Dori Hillestad Butler, illustrated by Nancy Meyers and published by Peachtree Publishers; and “Tiger vs. Nightmare,” written and illustrated by Emily Tetri and published by First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership.
William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens:
“Darius the Great Is Not Okay,” written by Adib Khorram, is the 2019 Morris Award winner. The book is published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House.

Four other books were finalists for the award: “Blood Water Paint,” written by Joy McCullough and published by Dutton Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House; Check, Please!: #Hockey,” written and illustrated by Ngozi Ukazu and published by First Second, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group; “Children of Blood and Bone,” written by Tomi Adeyemi and published by Henry Holt Books, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group; and “What the Night Sings,” written and illustrated by Vesper Stamper and published by Knopf Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House. 
YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults 

“The Unwanted: Stories of the Syrian Refugees,” written and illustrated by Don Brown, is the 2019 Excellence winner. The book is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Four other books were finalists for the award: “The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor,” written by Sonia Sotomayor and published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House; “Boots on the Ground: America’s War in Vietnam,” written by Elizabeth Partridge and published by Viking Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House; “The Faithful Spy: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the Plot to Kill Hitler,” written and illustrated by John Hendrix and published by Amulet Books, an imprint of ABRAMS; and "Hey, Kiddo: How I Lost My Mother, Found My Father, and Dealt with Family Addiction," written and illustrated by Jarrett J. Krosoczka and published by Graphix, an imprint of Scholastic. 
Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature ( including honor books)
The award promotes Asian/Pacific American culture and heritage and is awarded based on literary and artistic merit. The award offers three youth categories including Picture Book, Children’s Literature and Young Adult Literature. The award is administered by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association. This year’s winners include Picture Book winner is “Drawn Together,” written by Minh Lê, illustrated by Dan Santat and published by Disney Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group; Children’s Literature Category. This year’s winner is “Front Desk,” written by Kelly Yang and published by Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.; and Young Adult Literature is “Darius the Great is Not Okay,” written by Adib Khorram and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. 
Honor books were not noted in the announcement. Please find here a complete list of winners from the APALA website :

Young Adult Literature
The Asian/Pacific American Award for Young Adult Literature winner is Darius the Great is Not Okay, written by Adib Khorram, and published by Dial Books.
Darius is an introverted, awkward, tea-loving teenager in Portland, Oregon. He doesn’t fit in at school. Students mock his Persian name, and he is probably the only kid at Chapel Hill High who knows Klingon. Darius feels like a misfit at home too. The only things he shares with his white father are clinical depression and Star Trek nights. Plus, Darius doesn’t feel Persian enough in his family, especially since his younger sister speaks more Farsi. His sense of belonging – in his own skin, in his family, and as a Persian – is tested on his first trip to Iran when he visits his ill grandfather. Darius the Great is Not Okay was chosen as the winning title for its heartfelt portrayal of a teenager seeking a place to belong in his family and his culture. Like the friendship between Darius and Sohrab, the book is a sweet and tender coming-of-age tale. Many readers will relate to its realistic depiction of clinical depression and Darius’s struggle to feel confident in his biracial identity.
The committee selected one Young Adult Literature Honor title The Astonishing Color of After, written by Emily X.R. Pan, and published by Little Brown and Company.
A magical red bird appears in 15-year-old Leigh’s life after both a wonderful and tragic day. The wonderful day: Leigh kisses Axel, the best friend she is in love with. The same tragic day: Leigh comes home to news of her mother’s suicide. Unsure of her relationship with Axel, grieving her mother, and living with a distant father, Leigh feels alone except for the periodic sightings of a red bird. She follows the red bird’s directions to visit her estranged maternal grandparents in Taiwan, where Leigh learns cultural traditions and discovers family secrets. In Taiwan, she seeks connection to her mother’s life and reasons for her mother’s mental illness. Astonishing Color of After was honor for its honest depiction of the pain endured by families after suicide. The committee applauds the authentic representation of Taiwanese traditions and beliefs depicted across generations. The author illustrates a contemporary biracial teenager’s experience of living between cultures with vivid surrealism.
Children’s Literature
Front Desk written by Kelly Yang, and published by Arthur A. Levine Books (Scholastic), is the 2019 Asian/Pacific American Award for Children’s Literature winner.
Debut author Kelly Yang draws from personal experience to create a humorous and poignant novel, Front Desk, centering on 10-year-old Mia who manages a motel with her immigrant parents. Set in the 90s, readers experience firsthand the hardships of the immigrant experience – long working hours, toiling in menial work, institutional and outright racism, in-group oppression of newer immigrants, and the need to bite back one’s tongue. Yang’s take on key social issues is compelling and translatable beyond cultural borders by giving the voiceless a voice. The themes of community, empowerment, and strength are prevalent throughout, depicting the strength we gain from others and how a network of support can bind a community together.
The committee selected one Children’s Literature Honor title, The House that Lou Built, written by Mae Respicio, and published by Wendy Lamb Books.
Inspired by the emerging tiny house movement, Mae Respicio’s The House That Lou Built depicts a biracial protagonist who follows her dreams of building a small home on her father’s land. When her mother falls short on property payments and proposes a move to Northern California, Lou, along with her friends, finds a way to see her dream to reality. Lou redefines home beyond the traditional four walls as “more of a feeling — of comfort and trust, of people who are a part of you.” Respicio’s debut novel portrays Filipino culture with authenticity from personal recollections, creating a story around a rich culture while simultaneously showing the power of being able to depend on those around you.
Picture Book
The Picture Book winner is Drawn Together, written by Minh Lê, illustrated by Dan Santat, and published by Disney Hyperion.
Drawn Together is the story of a Thai-American boy and his grandfather, who seemingly at first do not share many things in common. They do not speak the same language, eat the same things, or have the same tastes in television shows, and so their world together is shared with many moments of silence. One afternoon their relationship changes over a shared love of art that eloquently captures the linguistic and cultural divides that originally separated the two.  As the two settle in to watch television together, the generational differences between them only continue to grow. The boy loses interest and turns to drawing with crayons and markers. The grandfather’s eyes light up and he brings out his calligraphy brush and ink, and they embark on a collaborative creative adventure that builds a bridge between their two worlds to create one, but not without a little tumult along the way. Lê’s words and Dan Santat’s art merge in a perfect blend of subtlety and exuberance to show that despite generational and cultural obstacles, we can be drawn together.
The committee selected one Picture Book Honor title, Grandmother’s Visit written by Betty Quan, illustrated by Carmen Mok, and published by Groundwood Books.
Grandmother’s Visit is a contemplative, quiet exploration of a Chinese-American’s girl loss when her grandmother passes.  The book opens with the sweet relationship between a granddaughter and grandmother who teaches her the secret ratio of rice to water and sharing her rich food memories of her childhood in China.  Everyday grandma walks the little girl to school in the morning and is waiting there for her afterschool to walk back home until one day, grandmother does not walk her to and from school anymore and grandma’s room remains closed and life is never the same after.  The little girl’s family begins the process of grieving, turning on all the lights outside of the house to help grandmother’s spirit say goodbye.  One night, the little girl goes into her grandmother’s room and sees her house key has bookmarked a picture of her grandmother holding her as a baby.  The granddaughter is able to say her final goodbye.  Quan’s quiet and spare tone is illustrated beautifully by Mok’s gray-toned digital paintings that visualize the author’s story of memory and grief.  Grandmother’s Visit is a lovely portrait of the relationship between a grandmother and her granddaughter, and just may remind readers that their own memories of grandparents are as numerous, and as clear, as grains of washed rice in water.
Sydney Taylor Book Award 

The Sydney Taylor Book Award is presented annually to outstanding books for children and teens that authentically portray the Jewish experience. Presented by the Association of Jewish Libraries since 1968, the award encourages the publication and widespread use of quality Judaic literature. This year’s winners include  
Younger Readers
 “All-of-a-Kind-Family Hanukkah,” by Emily Jenkins, illustrated by Paul Zelinsky, published by Schwartz & Wade, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books; 
Older Readers
 category winner is “Sweep: The Story of a Girl and Her Monster,” by Jonathan Auxier, published by Amulet Books, an imprint of Abrams;
Teen Readers 
“What the Night Sings,” by Vesper Stamper, illustrated by the author, published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books.

The Honor Books for the Sydney Taylor Awards were not part of the announcement. Here is a complete list from the Sydney Taylor website:

2019 marks the first time the Sydney Taylor Book Awards have been included in the American Library Association Youth Media Award announcements. 
GOLD MEDALISTS
Younger Readers
 All-of-a-Kind Family Hanukkah by Emily Jenkins, illustrated by Paul Zelinsky, published by Schwartz & Wade, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, won the Sydney Taylor Book Award in the Younger Readers category. In this meticulously researched Hanukkah story based on the classic children’s book All-of-aKind Family, poetic language and exuberant illustrations perfectly capture the emotions of each of the iconic sisters as they prepare latkes and celebrate the holiday in New York’s Lower East Side in 1912. 
 Older Readers
Sweep: The Story of a Girl and Her Monster by Jonathan Auxier, published by Amulet Books, an imprint of Abrams, won the Sydney Taylor Book Award in the Older Readers category. Auxier masterfully weaves Jewish themes and characters into the story of Nan Sparrow, a chimney climbing girl in Victorian London, and her remarkable friendship with Charlie, the soot golem who saves her life. 
Teen
 What the Night Sings by Vesper Stamper, illustrated by the author, published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, won the Sydney Taylor Book Award in the Teen Readers category. This beautifully illustrated novel tells the story of teen Holocaust survivor Gerta as she struggles to reconcile her identity and desires in the wake of tragedy. 

SILVER MEDALISTS
 Five Sydney Taylor Honor Books were also recognized. 

Younger Readers
Honor Books are 
A Moon for Moe and Mo by Jane Breskin Zalben, illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini, published by Charlesbridge, 
Through the Window: Views of Marc Chagall’s Life and Art by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Mary Grandpré, published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books. 
 Older Readers
Honor Books are:
All Three Stooges, by Erica S. Perl, published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, 
The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman, published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, a division of Penguin Random House.

 Teen Readers
Honor Book:
You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon, published by Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing

The American Indian Youth Literature award announcements also will be added to the ALA Youth Media Awards Announcement beginning in 2020. The award is announced in even years and established to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians. The award is administered by the American Indian Library Association (AILA), an affiliate of the American Library Association. Additional information regarding the American Indian Youth Literature Award is available at ailanet.org.
Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, ALA awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by judging committees of librarians and other children’s experts, the awards encourage original and creative work. For more information on the ALA youth media awards and notables, please visit www.ala.org/yma.
Each year the American Library Association honors books, videos and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards (YMAs), including the prestigious Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book Awards, guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth..


Thursday, January 17, 2019

YA Authors in Jersey City and 7th Black Comic Book Festival




Two young adult authors Gayle Forman and Jennifer Gilmore will be appearing Thursday, 1/17/19 at Word Bookstore, 123 Newark Avenue in Jersey City. They will engage in a conversation about young adult literature. Forman is  the author of If I Stay (soon to be a motion picture).




The 7th Annual Black Comic Book Festival takes place this weekend at the Schomburg Center in New York City at 515 Malcolm X Boulevard (135th St and Malcolm X Blvd)
New York, NY, 10037.  The festival will be held on Friday, January 18 from 12 PM - 7:30PM and on Saturday, January 19 from 10 AM to 7:30PM. The event is FREE. To register and get program information go to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-schomburg-centers-7th-annual-black-comic-book-festival-tickets-53316870194



Friday, September 21, 2018

Banned Books Week- Top Ten Banned/Challenged Books- 9/23-29/18


Top Ten for 2017
The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 354 challenges to library, school and university materials in 2017. Of the 416 books challenged or banned in 2017, the Top 10 Most Challenged Books are:

  1. Thirteen Reasons Why written by Jay Asher   Juv.A8254t
    Originally published in 2007, this New York Times bestseller has resurfaced as a controversial book after Netflix aired a TV series by the same name. This YA novel was challenged and banned in multiple school districts because it discusses suicide.
  2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian written by Sherman Alexie  Juv.A3847a
    Consistently challenged since its publication in 2007 for acknowledging issues such as poverty, alcoholism, and sexuality, this National Book Award winner was challenged in school curriculums because of profanity and situations that were deemed sexually explicit.
  3. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier   Juv.T2714d
    This Stonewall Honor Award-winning, 2012 graphic novel from an acclaimed cartoonist was challenged and banned in school libraries because it includes LGBT characters and was considered “confusing.”
  4. The Kite Runner written by Khaled Hosseini  
    This critically acclaimed, multigenerational novel was challenged and banned because it includes sexual violence and was thought to “lead to terrorism” and “promote Islam.”
  5. George written by Alex Gino  Juv.G4932g
    Written for elementary-age children, this Lambda Literary Award winner was challenged and banned because it includes a transgender child.
  6. Sex is a Funny Word written by Cory Silverberg and illustrated by Fiona Smyth Juv. 613.9.S587s
    This 2015 informational children’s book written by a certified sex educator was challenged because it addresses sex educationand is believed to lead children to “want to have sex or ask questions about sex.”
  7. To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee
    This Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, considered an American classic, was challenged and banned because of violence and its use of the N-word.
  8. The Hate U Give written by Angie Thomas
    Despite winning multiple awards and being the most searched-for book on Goodreads during its debut year, this YA novel was challenged and banned in school libraries and curriculums because it was considered “pervasively vulgar” and because of drug useprofanity, and offensive language.
  9. And Tango Makes Three written by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson and illustrated by Henry Cole
    Juv.R523a                                                                                                                                     Returning after a brief hiatus from the Top Ten Most Challenged list, this ALA Notable Children’s Book, published in 2005, was challenged and labeled because it features a same-sex relationship.
  10. I Am Jazz written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings and illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas                      Juv. 306.76H5474i
    This autobiographical picture book co-written by the 13-year-old protagonist was challenged because it addresses gender identity.


and not to forget Graphic Novels

Banned and Challenged Comics
The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund keeps lists and case studies of banned and challenged comics. They have many other resources as well 

For information and case studies of banned and challenged comics and graphic novels see http://cbldf.org/banned-challenged-comics/

The list includes these; reasons for the challenges are in parenthesis:

Amazing Spider-Man: Revelations by J. Michael Straczynski, John Romita, Jr., and Scott Hanna
(Sexual overtones)

Barefoot Gen by Keiji Nakazawa  
Juv. 952.04 .N163b
(Violence, discrimination)

Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again  by Frank Miller and Lynn Varley
(Sexism, offensive language, and unsuited to age group)

Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore and Brian Boland
(Advocates rape and violence)

Blankets by Craig Thompson
 PN6727 .T48 B58 2003
(Obscene images)

Bone by Jeff Smith
Juv. S65212b
(Promotion of smoking and drinking)

The Diary of a Teenage Girl by Phoebe Gloeckner
(Sexual content)

Dragon Ball by Akira Toriyama
(Violence and nudity)

Drama by Raina Telgemeier
 Juv.T2714d
(Sexual content)

The Color of Earth by Kim Dong Hwa
Juv.K495
(Nudity, sexual content, and unsuited to age group)

Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
PN6727.B3757.Z46 2006
(Obscene images)


The Graveyard Book ( Graphic Novel)by Neil Gaiman and P. Craig Russell
(Violent imagery)

Ice Haven by Daniel Clowes
(Profanity, coarse language, and brief non-sexual nudity)

In The Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
Juv. S4745i
(Nudity)

League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill
(Sex scenes)

Maus by Art Spiegelman
Juv. S755m
(Anti-ethnic and unsuited for age group)

Neonomicon by Alan Moore and Jacen Burrows
(Sexual content)

Palomar by Gilbert Hernandez
(Sexual content, child pornography)

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
Juv.955.05.S353pr
(Profanity, violent content)

Pride of Baghdad by Brian K. Vaughan and Niko Henrichon
Juv. V3644p
(Sexual content)

Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples
PN6727 .V387 S24 2012
(Sexual content, anti-family, nudity, offensive language, and unsuited for age group.) 

Sandman by Neil Gaiman and various artists
PN6728 .S26 G35 1991
(Anti-family themes, offensive language, and unsuited for age group)

SideScrollers by Matthew Loux
(Profanity and sexual references)

Stuck in the Middle, edited by Ariel Schrag
(Language, sexual content, and drug references)

Stuck Rubber Baby by Howard Cruse
(Depiction of homosexuality)

Tank Girl by Alan Martin and Jamie Hewlett
(Nudity and violence)

This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
Juv. T1533t
(Sexual content, unsuited to age group)

Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons
Juv. M8212w
(Unsuited to age group)

Y: The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra
Juv.V3644y
(Sexual content)

AND
Take the New York Times Banned Books Week Quiz!
https://www.nypl.org/bannedbooks