Thursday, April 12, 2018

National Poetry Month: Renee Watson and Langston Hughes


Award-winning Children's  and YA Author Renee Watson establishes a museum and arts center in the former home of Harlem Renaissance poet, Langston Hughes.



Renee Watson author of the
Newbery Honor book/ Coretta Scott King Award , Piecing Me Together
Harlem's Little Blackbird, and A Place Where Hurricanes Happen is working to continue the community work of Langston Hughes

Juv. W 3416pm
Juv. 927.82.M657w
Juv. W3416p







Monday, February 12, 2018

ALA Youth Media Awards 2018- 2/12/18


The 2018 Youth Media Award announcements will take place on Monday, Feb. 12, at 8 a.m. MT (10 a.m.Eastern)  from the Colorado Convention Center. Fans can follow 2018 results in real-time via live webcast at http://ala.unikron.com/2018 , or follow hashtag #alayma.     
Each year the American Library Association honors books, videos and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards (YMAs), including the prestigious Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book Awards, guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth.
For information regarding this year's presentation, please visitwww.ilovelibraries.org/yma
Winners list from https://www.morningstar.com/news/pr-news-wire/PRNews_20180212DC11934/american-library-association-announces-2018-youth-media-award-winners.html

DENVER, Feb. 12, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Library Association (ALA) today announced the top books, video and audio books for children and young adults—including the Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, Newbery and Printz awards—at its Midwinter Meeting in Denver, Colorado.
A list of all the 2018 award winners follows:

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature:
2018 Newbery Medal winner

  • "Hello, Universe" written by Erin Entrada Kelly. The book is published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

 Newbery Honor Books also were named: 

  • "Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut," written by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Gordon C. James and published by Bolden, an Agate Imprint, a Denene Millner Book; 
  • "Long Way Down," written by Jason Reynolds and published by Atheneum, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book
  •  "Piecing Me Together," written by Renée Watson and published by Bloomsbury Children's Books.
Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:
2018 Caldecott Medal winner:

  • "Wolf in the Snow," illustrated and written by Matthew Cordell. The book was published by Feiwel and Friends, an Imprint of Macmillan.


Four Caldecott Honor Books also were named: 

  • "Big Cat, Little Cat," illustrated and written by Elisha Cooper and published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership; 
  • "Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut," illustrated by Gordon C. James, written by Derrick Barnes, and published by Bolden, an Agate Imprint, a Denene Millner Book; 
  • "A Different Pond," illustrated by Thi Bui, written by Bao Phi and published by Capstone Young Readers, a Capstone imprint.
  •  "Grand Canyon," illustrated and written by Jason Chin, a Neal Porter Book, published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership.
Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognizing African American authors and illustrators of outstanding books for children and young adults:

King Author Award winner;

  • "Piecing Me Together," written by Renée Watson, is the K. The book is published by Bloomsbury Children's Books. 
 King Author Honor Books also were named: 

  • "Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut," written by Derrick Barnes, published by Bolden, an Agate Imprint, a Denene Millner Book;  
  • "Long Way Down," written by Jason Reynolds, published by Atheneum, an Imprint of Simon &; Schuster Children's Publishing Division, a Caitlyn Dlouhy Book 
  • "The Hate U Give," written by Angie Thomas, published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
King Illustrator Award winner;

  •  "Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets," illustrated by Ekua Holmes, is the . The book is written by Kwame Alexander with Chris Colderly and Marjory Wentworth and published by Candlewick Press.
Two King Illustrator Honor Books:

  •  "Crown: An Ode to a Fresh Cut," illustrated by Gordon C. James, written by Derrick Barnes and published by Bolden, an Agate Imprint, a Denene Millner Book 
  •  "Before She Was Harriet: The Story of Harriet Tubman," illustrated by James E. Ransome, written by Lesa Cline-Ransome and published by Holiday House.  
Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award to affirm new talent:

  • "The Stars Beneath Our Feet," written by David Barclay Moore, is the Steptoe Author Award winner. The book is published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children's Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.
  • "Mama Africa! How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with Her Song," illustrated by Charly Palmer, is the Steptoe Illustrator Award winner. The book is written by Kathryn Erskine and published by Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC.
Coretta Scott King–Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement:
Eloise Greenfield is the winner of the Coretta Scott King–Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children's author Virginia Hamilton. 
Eloise Greenfield was born in Parmele, North Carolina, and currently resides in Washington, D.C. Early in life, she discovered a love of reading and writing and realized there were few books that showed the fullness of African American life. She published her first book in 1972 and went on to write and publish more than 40 books. From "Honey, I Love" to "The Great Migration," this multiple award-winning author has captivated audiences through the years.

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults:
2018 Printz Award winner.

  • "We Are Okay," written by Nina LaCour, is the  The book is published by Dutton Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers.
Four Printz Honor Books also were named: 

  • "The Hate U Give," written by Angie Thomas and published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers;
  •  "Long Way Down," written by Jason Reynolds and published by Caitlyn Dlouhy Books/Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing;
  •  "Strange the Dreamer," written by Laini Taylor and published by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, a division of Hachette Book Group and 
  • "Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers," written by Deborah Heiligman and published by Godwin Books/Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group.
Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:
Award for young children (ages 0 to 8).;

  • "Silent Days, Silent Dreams," written and illustrated by Allen Say and published by Arthur A. Levine Books, an Imprint of Scholastic Inc., 
Award for middle grades (ages 9-13).

  • "Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess," written by Shari Green and published by Pajama Press Inc.
Award for teens (ages 14-18):

  • "You're Welcome, Universe," written and illustrated by Whitney Gardner and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children's Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC is the 
Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences:

  • "All Systems Red," by Martha Wells, a Tor.com Book, published by Thomas Doherty Associates; 
  • "The Clockwork Dynasty," by Daniel H. Wilson, published by Doubleday, a division of Penguin Random House LLC; 
  • "Down Among the Sticks and Bones," by Seanan McGuire, a Tor.com Book, published by Thomas Doherty Associates; 
  • "Electric Arches," by Eve L. Ewing, published by Haymarket Books; 
  • "A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea," by Melissa Fleming, published by Flatiron Books; 
  • "Malagash," by Joey Comeau, published by ECW Press; 
  • "Roughneck," by Jeff Lemire, published by Gallery 13, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc.;
  •  "She Rides Shotgun," by Jordan Harper, published by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers;
  •  "Things We Have in Common," by Tasha Kavanagh, published by MIRA Books 
  • "An Unkindness of Magicians," by Kat Howard, published by SAGA Press, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. 
The 2018 winner is Jacqueline Woodson, whose award-winning works include "Brown Girl Dreaming," "After Tupac & D Foster," "Locomotion" and "Show Way."  

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults:
The 2018 winner is Angela Johnson. Her books include "Heaven," "Looking for Red," "The First Part Last" and "Sweet, Hereafter," all published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing; "Bird," published by Puffin Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers and "Toning the Sweep," published by Orchard Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.

2019 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award recognizing an author, critic, librarian, historian or teacher of children's literature, who then presents a lecture at a winning host site. 
Debbie Reese will deliver the 2019 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Dr. Reese is a longtime advocate for Native representation and is a former teacher and university professor. She earned her PhD in Education from the University of Illinois, where she also helped establish the Native American House and American Indian Studies program. Dr. Reese also holds an M.Ed degree in Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. She is tribally enrolled at Nambe Owingeh Pueblo in New Mexico.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children's book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States, and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States:


  • "The Murderer's Ape" is the 2018 Batchelder Award winner. Originally published in Sweden as "Mördarens Apa," the book was written and illustrated by Jakob Wegelius, translated from Swedish by Peter Graves and published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children's Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.
 Batchelder Honor Books also were named: 

  • "Malala: Activist for Girls' Education," published by Charlesbridge Publishing, written by Raphaële Frier, illustrated by Aurélia Fronty and translated from French by Julie Cormier; 
  • "When a Wolf is Hungry," published by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, written by Christine Naumann-Villemin, illustrated by Kris Di Giacomo and translated from French by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers 
  • "You Can't Be Too Careful!," published by Elsewhere Editions, written and illustrated by Roger Mello, and translated from Portuguese by Daniel Hahn.
Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States:
  • "The Hate U Give," produced by HarperAudio, is the 2018 Odyssey Award winner. The book is written by Angie Thomasand narrated by Bahni Turpin.
Five Odyssey Honor Audiobooks also were named: 
  • "The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage," produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, written by Philip Pullman and narrated by Michael Sheen; 
  • "A Boy Called Christmas," produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, written by Matt Haig and narrated by Stephen Fry; 
  • "Long Way Down," produced by Simon & Schuster Audio and written and narrated by Jason Reynolds;
  •  "Trombone Shorty" produced by Live Oak Media, written by Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews and narrated by Dion Graham
  • "The Wizards of Once" produced by Hachette Audio, written by Cressida Cowell and narrated by David Tennant.  
Pura Belpré Awards honoring Latino writers and illustrators whose children's books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:
Belpré Illustrator Award winner:
  • "La Princesa and the Pea," illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal, is the . The book was written by Susan Middleton Elya and published by G. P. Putnam's Sons, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
Two Belpré Illustrator Honor Books also were named:
  • "All Around Us," illustrated by Adriana M. Garcia, written by Xelena González and published by Cinco Puntos Press and "Frida Kahlo and Her Animalitos," illustrated by John Parra, written by Monica Brown and published by NorthSouth Books, Inc., an imprint of NordSüd Verlag AG.
  • "Lucky Broken Girl," written by Ruth Behar, is the Pura Belpré Author Award winner. The book is published by Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. 
Two Belpré Author Honor Books also were named: "
  • "The Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora," written by Pablo Cartaya and published by Viking, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC 
  •  "The First Rule of Punk," written by Celia C. Pérez and published by Viking, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:
Sibert Award winner.
  • "Twelve Days in May: Freedom Ride 1961," written by Larry Dane Brimner, is the  The book is published by Calkins Creek, an imprint of Highlights.
Four Sibert Honor Books also were named: 
  • "Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix," written by Jacqueline Briggs Martin and June Jo Lee, illustrated by Man One and published by Readers to Eaters Books; 
  • "Grand Canyon," written and illustrated by Jason Chin and published by Roaring Book Press, a Neal Porter Book; 
  • "Not So Different: What You Really Want to Ask about Having a Disability," written by Shane Burcaw, illustrated by Matt Carr and published by Roaring Brook Press 
  • "Sea Otter Heroes: The Predators That Saved an Ecosystem," written by Patricia Newman and published by Millbrook Press, a division of Lerner Publishing Group, Inc.
Stonewall Book Award–Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children's & Young Adult Literature Award given annually to English-language children's and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience:

2018 recipients of the Stonewall Book Awards–
  • "Little & Lion," written by Brandy Colbert and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group Inc. 
  •  "The 57 Bus," written by Dashka Slater and published by Farrar Straus Giroux for Young Readers, an imprint of Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC are the 2018 recipients of the Stonewall Book Awards–Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children's & Young Adult Literature Award.
 Stonewall Honor Books were also named: 
  • "As the Crow Flies," written and illustrated by Melanie Gillman and published by Iron Circus Comics 
  • "The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue," written by Mackenzi Lee and published by Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.  
Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished book for beginning readers is:

Geisel Award:
  • "Charlie & Mouse," written by Laurel Snyder and illustrated by Emily Hughes. The book is published by Chronicle Books.
Geisel Honor Books: 
  • "I See a Cat," written and illustrated by Paul Meisel and published by Holiday House;
  •  "King & Kayla and the Case of the Missing Dog Treats," written by Dori Hillestad Butler, illustrated by Nancy Meyers and published by Peachtree Publishers; 
  • "My Kite Is Stuck! And Other Stories," written and illustrated by Salina Yoon and published by Bloomsbury Children's Books;
  •  "Noodleheads See the Future," written by Tedd Arnold, Martha Hamilton and Mitch Weiss, illustrated by Tedd Arnold and published by Holiday House
  • "Snail &Worm Again," written and illustrated by Tina Kügler and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens:
2018 Morris Award winner
  • "The Hate U Give," written by Angie Thomas, is the . The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
Four other books were finalists for the award:

  •  "Dear Martin," written by Nic Stone and published by Crown Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children's Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC; 
  • "Devils Within," written by S. F. Henson and published by Sky Pony Press, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing; 
  • "Saints and Misfits," written by S. K. Ali and published by Salaam Reads, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing 
  •  "Starfish," written by Akemi Dawn Bowman and published by Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing.
YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults:
2018 Excellence winner. 

  •   "Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers," written by Deborah Heiligman, The book is published by Godwin Books/Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group. 
Four other books were finalists for the award: 

  • "#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women," edited by Mary Beth Leatherdale and Lisa Charleyboy and published by Annick Press; "
  • "Eyes of the World: Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, The Invention of Modern Photojournalism," written by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos and published by Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group; 
  • "The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That Changed Their Lives," written by Dashka Slater and published by Farrar Straus Giroux, an imprint of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group 
  • "The Whydah: A Pirate Ship Feared, Wrecked, and Found," written by Martin W. Sandler and published by Candlewick Press.
Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, ALA awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by judging committees of librarians and other children's experts, the awards encourage original and creative work.  For more information on the ALA Youth Media Awards and notables, please visit www.ala.org/yma.
SOURCE American Library Association










Monday, February 05, 2018

Teaching Slavery

Recently a Bronx teacher was removed from the classroom, after choosing three Black students to demonstrate the conditions on slave ships. Allegedly, when one of the students giggled, the teacher stepped on her back. Not an effective lesson.
Newsweek (http://www.newsweek.com/teacher-stepped-black-students-back-slavery-lesson-798405)

A similar incident occurred in 2008, and was blogged about on this site.
http://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2008/12/teaching-african-american-history-and.html

The Southern Poverty Law Center's -Teaching Tolerance Project has released a report on " Teaching the Hard History of American Slavery"
https://www.splcenter.org/teaching-hard-history-american-slavery

Because:
  • schools are not adequately teaching the history of American slavery.
  •  Educators are not sufficiently prepared to teach it. 
  • Textbooks do not have enough material about it.

Take the Quiz- How much do you know about slavery?

The SPLC found that:
Slavery is not simply an event in our history; it’s central to our history.

American enslavement of Africans shaped our country's sociopolitical institutions and formed the cornerstone of our industrial revolution. Today the persistent disparities African Americans face — and the backlash that seems to follow every African-American advancement — trace their roots to slavery and its aftermath.
To understand the world today we must understand slavery. But SPLC research shows our schools are failing to teach the hard history of African enslavement. 
They surveyed U.S. high school seniors and social studies teachers, analyzed a selection of state content standards, and reviewed 10 popular U.S. history textbooks. They found:
  • High school seniors struggle on even the most basic questions about American enslavement of Africans.
  • Teachers who are serious about teaching slavery struggle to provide deep coverage of the subject in the classroom.
  • Popular textbooks fail to comprehensively cover slavery and enslaved peoples.
  • State content standards are timid and fail to set appropriately high expectations. 

Use these resources:
A comprehensive guide for teaching and learning this critical topic—
A Framework for Teaching American Slavery.

Here are a few key elements of the framework and the accompanying resources:
  • Key Concepts and Summary Objectives — Important big ideas and critical content students must know to understand the historical significance of slavery.
  • Primary Source Texts — The Teaching Hard History Text Library features over 100 sources, all with text-dependent questions.
  • Teaching Tools — Browse six sample Inquiry Design Models, based on The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards.
  • Podcast — Hosted by Professor Hasan Jeffries, this series brings us the lessons we should have learned in school through the voices of leading scholars and educators.
  • Student Quiz — Use this 12-question quiz as a formative assessment.
  • Webinar — Join us live on February 13 or learn on demand.
Some other resources
Books
Maroon teachers : teaching the transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans/ Sandra Gift (HT1072 .G55 2008)
Trading souls : Europe's transatlantic trade in Africans/ Hilary Beckles (HT1322 .B434 2007)
Saving souls : the struggle to end the transatlantic trade in Africans / Hilary Beckles (HT1322 .B27 2007)
Inhuman traffick : the international struggle against the transatlantic slave trade : a graphic history/Rafe Blaufarb (Juv. 306.3 .B645i)

Websites
African Passages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
In Motion: the African American Experience
http://www.inmotionaame.org/home.cfm?site=html


Thursday, January 11, 2018

National Day of Racial Healing- 1/16/18



January 16, 2018 will mark the second National Day of Racial Healing.

From http://healourcommunities.org/ndorh-2018/
People, organizations and communities throughout the U.S. are coming together on Jan. 16, 2018 to call for racial healing, celebrate their common humanity and take collective action to create a more just and equitable world.

The National Day of Racial Healing (#NDORH) is a part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) effort – a national and community-based process to plan for and bring about transformational and sustainable change, and to address the historic and contemporary effects of racism.

The goals of the day are to:
  1. Find ways to reinforce and honor our common humanity and create space to celebrate the distinct differences that make our communities vibrant.
  2. Acknowledge that there are still deep racial divisions in America that must be overcome and healed.
  3. Commit to engaging people from all racial, ethnic, religious and identity groups in genuine efforts to increase understanding, communication, caring and respect for one another.
Books for social justice:
Working Together for Justice
This list was compiled by the Quicklists Consulting Committee of the Association for Library Service to
Children, a division of the American Library Association.

The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) is a division of the American Library Association. ALSC’s core purpose is creating a better future for children through libraries through the core values of: collaboration, excellence, inclusiveness, innovation, integrity and respect, leadership and responsiveness. This booklist was created to affirm the rights of children and families. The titles on this list are meant to encourage discussions about social justice and equity. For more information about this and other ALSC booklists, please visit http://www.ala.org/alsc/booklists.

Books with call numbers appended are in the Congressman Frank J. Guarini Library:


Cohn, Diana. Illus. by Francisco Delgado. !Si Se Puede!/Yes We Can! Cinco Puntos Press, 2002. 978-0938317661 (K-2) Juv.C6787s 

Evans, Shane W. Illus. by author. We March. Roaring Brook Press, 2012. 978-1596435391 (Pre-3)
Juv.E927w

Freedman, Russell. The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004. 978-0618159765 (4-8) Juv.782.1092 .F853v

Hoose, Phillip M. Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice (Reprint edition). Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2014. 978-0374302368 (6-up) Juv.323.092 .H789c

Krull, Kathleen. Illus. by Yuyi Morales. Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez. Harcourt, Inc., 2003. 978-0152014377 (Pre-2) Juv.331.8813 .K94h

Kulling, Monica. Illus. by Felicita Sala. On Our Way to Oyster Bay: Mother Jones and Her March for Children’s Rights. Kids Can Press, 2016. 978-1771383257 (1-4)

Levinson, Cynthia. We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March. Peachtree Publishers, 2012. 978-1561456277 (6-8) Juv. 323.11 .L665w

Levy, Debbie. Illus. by Vanessa Brantley-Newton. We Shall Overcome: The Story of A Song. Jump at the Sun Books, 2013. 978-1423119548 (1-4)

Lewis, John and Andrew Aydin. Illus. by Nate Powell. March, Book One. Top Shelf Productions, 2013. 978-1603093002 (6-up) Juv.923.6 .L674

Johnson, Angela. Illus. by Eric Velasquez. A Sweet Smell of Roses. Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2005. 978-0689832529 (K-2) Juv.J662s

Kimmel, Elizabeth Cody. Illus. by Guiliano Ferri. A Taste of Freedom: Gandhi and The Great Salt March. Walker Books for Young Readers, 2014. 978-0802794673 (1-3)

Lee, Spike & Lee, Tonya Lewis. Illus. by Sean Qualls. Giant Steps to Change the World. Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2011. 978-0689868153 (K-3) Juv.L4813g

Monday, December 11, 2017

Ezra Jack Keats postage stamp

Back in 2009, there was a move to memorialize the 2012 50th Anniversary of the classic children's book, "A Snowy Day" by the late Ezra Jack Keats (http://educationservicesnews.blogspot.com/2009/05/ezra-jack-keats-snowy-day-stamp-in-2012.html)

Unfortunately, it took a little more time thank three years. But the stamp is now a reality in 2017!

On October 4, 2017, the stamp was given its official release in Keats' home town of Brooklyn NY.
The press release from the United States Postal Service  goes on to say:

Each of the four new stamps in this 20-stamp booklet features a different illustration of main character Peter exploring and playing in his neighborhood while wearing his iconic red snowsuit. The images include: Peter forming a snowball, Peter sliding down a mountain of snow, Peter making a snow angel and Peter leaving footprints in the snow.

Since the publication of this treasured tale five decades ago young readers have enjoyed joining Peter on his winter adventure. Unlike most popular children’s authors at the time, Keats made a point to feature ethnically and racially diverse characters in his work. Inspired by a series of 1940 Life magazine photographs of a young African-American boy, Keats began writing The Snowy Day. Using paper collage, fabric, stamps and India ink, he crafted the unique look of the story’s wintry urban landscape.

Edited by Annis Duff and published in 1962, The Snowy Day has become a classic. Since its release, it has sold millions of copies.

As Peter starred in six more Keats stories, readers watched him grow older in print. Before the author’s death in 1983, he wrote and illustrated 22 children’s books and provided artwork for dozens more. Countless readers identified with his characters and stories, which brought added diversity to mainstream children's literature.

https://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2017/pr17_058.htm


Thursday, November 09, 2017

November is Native American Heritage Month


Books to Celebrate Native American Heritage Month!

Ancona, George                      Powwow                                             
Juv.394.2.A542p

Boyden, Linda                        Powwow’s Coming                             
Juv. 394.3.B789p

Bruchac, James and                Girl Who helped Thunder and Other Native American Folktales
Juv.398.2.B877g

Bruchac, Joseph                      Eagle Song 
Juv.B887e

Bruchac, Joseph                      Pushing Up the Sky                           
Juv.812.54.B887p

Bruchac, Joseph                      Earth Under the Sky: Native  American Poems of the Land             
Juv. 398.2.B887e

Bruchac, Joseph                      Seven Native American  Plays for Children                     
Juv. 812.54 .B887p

                                               
Dennis, Yvonne Wakim          Children of Native America Today    
Juv.306.08997073.D411c

Landon, Rocky                       A Native American throught of it     
Juv. 970.1.L259n

Morris, Ann                             Grandma Maxine remembers:A Native American family story
Juv.978.004.M875g                                                

Salonen, Roxanne B.              First Salmon 
Juv.S1753f
                                                              
Slier, Debby                            Cradle me                                            
Juv.305.23.S633c
                                               
Taylor, C. J.                           All the Stars in the Sky: Native Stories from the Heavens
 Juv.398.2.T239a

Van Camp, Richard                Little You                                              
Juv.V2225L

Since Thanksgiving also occurs in November. Here is a list of books recommended by OYATE (Oyate is a Native organization working to see that our lives and histories are portrayed with honesty and integrity, and that all people know that our stories belong to us.)

OYATE RECOMMENDED BOOKS
FOR THANKSGIVING
(unfortunately quite a few of these are out of print) 



Bruchac, Margaret M. (Abenaki), and Catherine Grace O’Neill, 1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, 2001, grades 4-up
 (Juv. 394.268 .G729S)

Hunter, Sally M. (Ojibwe), Four Seasons of Corn: A Winnebago Tradition. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 1997, grades 4-6. (Juv.394.1 .H947f)

Peters, Russell M. (Wampanoag), Clambake: A Wampanoag Tradition. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 1992, grades 4-6. (Juv. 974.48 .P481c)


Regguinti, Gordon (Ojibwe), The Sacred Harvest: Ojibway Wild Rice Gathering. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 1992, grades 4-6. (Juv. 977.6 .R334s)

Seale, Doris (Santee/Cree), Beverly Slapin, and Carolyn Silverman (Cherokee), eds., Thanksgiving: A Native Perspective. Berkeley: Oyate, 1998, teacher resource.

Swamp, Jake (Mohawk), Giving Thanks: A Native American Good Morning Message. New York: Lee & Low, 1995, all grades.(Juv. 299.79 .S791g)

Wittstock, Laura Waterman (Seneca), Ininatig’s Gift of Sugar: Traditional Native Sugarmaking. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 1993, grades 4-6

OYATE Also provides the following materials

Deconstructing the Myths of "The First Thanksgiving"
by Judy Dow (Abenaki) and Beverly Slapin
Revised 06/12/06

How to Tell the Difference: A Guide for Evaluating Children’s Books for Anti-Indian Bias 
by Doris Seale, Beverly Slapin and Rosemary Gonzales                             http://oyate.org/index.php/resources/41-resources/how-to-tell-the-difference


Monday, October 30, 2017

Mix It Up at Lunch Day-10/31/17





Mix It Up at Lunch Day is an international campaign that encourages students to identify, question and cross social boundaries. While schools can register to host a Mix It Up event on any day of the year, millions of students around the world participate on the official Mix It Up at Lunch Day, held on the last Tuesday of each October. It’s October 31st this year! 


Students consistently identify the cafeteria as a place in their school where divisions are clearly—and harshly—drawn. So we ask students to move out of their comfort zones and connect with someone new over lunch. It’s a simple act with profound implications that we encourage educators to include in year-round efforts to promote healthy, welcoming school environments. Studies have shown that interactions across group lines can help reduce prejudice. When students interact with those who are different from them, biases and misperceptions can fall away.

https://www.tolerance.org/mix-it-up

And a few books to read about lunch, and school and cafeterias!:


Arnold, Tedd.
Super Fly Guy / Tedd Arnold.
Juv..A759s                                    










Krosoczka, Jarrett.
Lunch Lady and the bake sale bandit
Juv.K938L                                    

Krosoczka, Jarrett.
Lunch lady and the cyborg substitute
Juv.K938Lc                                    

Krosoczka, Jarrett.
Lunch Lady and the League of Librarians
Juv.K938LL     
                             
Krosoczka, Jarrett.
Lunch Lady and the author visit vendetta
Juv.K938La                                   


Krosoczka, Jarrett
Lunch Lady and the schoolwide scuffle
Juv.K938Ls  
                                 
Prelutsky, Jack.
What a day it was at school!: poems
Juv.811.54 .P924w