Friday, April 29, 2016

Arturo O Martinez, author of Pedrito's World passes away

Hoboken author, Arturo O. Martinez passed away on Wednesday, April 27th, 2016. 

His obituary in the Star Ledger reported:

Born in Rio Grande City, Texas, he was a graduate of Rio Grande City High School and earned a bachelor's degree in journalism at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1959. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Arturo spent more than 40 years in journalism-as a reporter, editor, critic and columnist. Prior to joining the staff of The Star-Ledger in New Jersey in 1968, he was a reporter for The Alamo Messenger in San Antonio and The Lafayette Advertiser in Louisiana. During three decades at The Star-Ledger, he held a variety of posts, including Entertainment and Features Editor for 20 years prior to his retirement in 1998. He continued to write a column on Latino arts and entertainment until 2003. While entertainment editor, Martinez served as a voter for Broadway's annual Tony Awards, a position he held for almost 18 years. His interest in the theater continued into his retirement; two of his one-act plays were produced in Hoboken. Also in his retirement, he wrote "Pedrito's World," a fictive memoir based on his recollections and family stories from South Texas. The book, published by Texas Tech University Press, received an award from the Texas Institute of Letters. A sequel was published in December. - See more at: http://obits.nj.com/obituaries/jerseyjournal/obituary.aspx?n=arturo-o-martinez&pid=179818008&fhid=17066#sthash.uULmkjaN.dpuf

Martinez had given a reading from his acclaimed memoir, Pedrito's World,(Juv. M3852p) at New Jersey City University in  February, 2008.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

2015 ALA Banned Books List

Frequently Challenged Books 2015


The ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) receives reports from libraries, schools, and the media on attempts to ban books in communities across the country. We compile lists of challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship efforts that affect libraries and schools.
The top ten most challenged books of 2015 include:
  1. Looking for Alaska, by John Green (Juv.G7955L)Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  2. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James
    Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, and other (“poorly written,” “concerns that a group of teenagers will want to try it”).
  3. I Am Jazz, by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings (Juv.306.76 .H574i)
    Reasons: Inaccurate, homosexuality, sex education, religious viewpoint, and unsuited for age group.
  4. Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out, by Susan Kuklin (Juv.306.76 .K965)
    Reasons: Anti-family, offensive language, homosexuality, sex education, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other (“wants to remove from collection to ward off complaints”).
  5. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Mark Haddon (PR6058.A245 C87 2003)
    Reasons: Offensive language, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other (“profanity and atheism”).
  6. The Holy Bible (BS185 1980 .N48)
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint.
  7. Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel (PN6727 .B3757 Z46 2006)
    Reasons: Violence and other (“graphic images”).
  8. Habibi, by Craig Thompson
    Reasons: Nudity, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  9. Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan, by Jeanette Winter ( Juv. 371.82.W785n)
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group, and violence.
  10. Two Boys Kissing, by David Levithan (Juv.6662t)
    Reasons: Homosexuality and other (“condones public displays of affection”).

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Jersey City seeks authors and performers for Tales of our Cities Book Festival 9/25/16

Tales of Our Cities 2016 Talent Outreach





Jersey City Public Library Looking for Talented
 Writers, Poets, Singer/Songwriters & Spoken Word Artists
for Tales of Our Cities 2016

8th Annual Book Festival to be Staged at Van Vorst Park on Sunday, September 25

JERSEY CITY, N.J.   March 7, 2016 –

 “The application is posted!” That’s the answer to the question: “How can I apply to Tales of Our Cities – the annual book festival in Jersey City?” Just go to the Jersey City library website – www.jclibrary.org
and scroll down to the Tales of Our Cities portal http://www.jclibrary.org/resources/tales-of-our-cities-2016

 The 8th annual Jersey City library book festival, Tales of Our Cities 2016, will be presented on Sunday, September 25, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Now is the time for all authors, singer/songwriters, poets, spoken word artists, vendors and publishers to apply.

The participant’s contract and outreach flyer are available on the library website to download and print, along with contact information.

 The participant application deadline is Monday, July 11. Please contact Elysse Sison at esison@jclibrary.org, (201) 547-4543 or by fax, (201) 656-1517.

 Due to the ongoing renovations at the Main Library, the Tales of Our Cities book festival was not presented in 2015, and in 2014, the festival was staged at Grove Street Plaza.
For 2016, the book festival will be in familiar surroundings – the gazebo and extensive grounds of Van Vorst Park.




Wednesday, March 09, 2016

Environment and Elections-Lesson Plans for Earth Day and Beyond


As Earth Day approaches, lesson plans on the Flint Water crisis provide an interesting perspective

Flint Water Crisis 

Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center has a lesson plan on Progressive City Planners
http://www.tolerance.org/lesson/progressive-city-planners  with these objectives:

Objectives:
Students will:
  • Consider how our society is divided by race and class and consider the stark differences in treatment within communities
  • Evaluate previous biases against people of color and working-class communities.
  • Analyze the impact of environmental racism on the health and well-being of communities of color
  • Create a vision of a more just and equitable society
Another environmental lesson plan was included in this blog's post



The Teachable Moment
The Teachable Moment a project of the Morningside Center
has the following lesson plan  and readings specifically on the crisis


Elections 

The Teachable Moment also has lessons on the current elections
http://www.morningsidecenter.org/search/node/elections%20type%3Ateachable_moment_lesson

Teaching Tolerance has lesson plans on past election and voters' rights concerns
http://www.tolerance.org/classroom-resources?keys=elections&type=All&topic=All&grade=All&domain=All&subject=All

For more lesson plan websites and other materials   check this bibliography
http://www.njcu.edu/guarini/department/EdServiceBib/LessonPlans.pdf


Tuesday, March 08, 2016

Support Literacy with one Email today






Help Our LSTA / IAL Library Champions Help Us Now!

It's that time of year again when Congressional cost-cutters sharpen their budget knives and go looking for under-supported federal programs to slash or discontinue. Last year, now Speaker of the House Paul Ryan proposed completely eliminating IMLS and with it over $200 million in funding for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL). Both of these programs are potentially on the chopping block this year and it's up to you to help save them.  

Library champions in Congress are now circulating "Dear Appropriator" letters to their colleagues urging members of the powerful Senate and House Appropriations Committees to fully fund LSTA and IAL (See the letters here). 

Please take just five minutes to contact your Representative in the House and both of your U.S. Senators and ask them to sign these letters (one each for LSTA and IAL in each chamber of Congress). Your help, and these funds, make a huge difference in what libraries and librarians can do for their patrons in every corner of the country.

These "Dear Appropriator" letters carry tremendous weight with the Appropriations Committee. The more Members of Congress who sign them, the more likely LSTA and IAL - and the millions of Americans they help every year - are to survive and thrive.

Time is short! Please, contact both your Senators and Representative now.




AND AFTER THAT
TRY THIS  SITE TO SEE HOW PEOPLE WITH A READING DISABILITY
 EXPERIENCE  READING

Click for a DYSLEXIA EXPERIENCE


Tuesday, January 05, 2016

ALA Youth Media Awards 2016-1/11/16

The 2016 Youth Media Awards will be announced at 8 a.m. on January 11, 2016, during the ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibition in Boston. The prestigious children’s literature prizes include the Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Pura Belpre (20th Anniversary) and  Coretta Scott King Book Awards.



Those unable to attend in-person can tune in for the live webcast  (http://ala.unikron.com/2016/)!

Follow @ILoveLibraries for the latest on the award news.
The official hashtag is #ALAyma.

Winners list:
John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature:
“Last Stop on Market Street,” written by Matt de la Peña, is the 2016 Newbery Medal winner. The book is illustrated by Christian Robinson and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.
Three Newbery Honor Books also were named: “The War that Saved My Life,” written by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; “Roller Girl,” written and illustrated by Victoria Jamieson and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; and “Echo,” written by Pam Muñoz Ryan and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.


Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:
“Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear,” illustrated by Sophie Blackall, is the 2016 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was written by Lindsay Mattick and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.
Four Caldecott Honor Books also were named: “Trombone Shorty,” illustrated by Bryan Collier, written by Troy Andrews and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS; “Waiting,” illustrated and written by Kevin Henkes, published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; “Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement,” illustrated by Ekua Holmes, written by Carole Boston Weatherford and published by Candlewick Press; and “Last Stop on Market Street,” illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Matt de le Peña and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.


Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:
“Gone Crazy in Alabama,” written by Rita Williams-Garcia, is the King Author Book winner. The book is published by Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
Three King Author Honor Books were selected: “All American Boys,” by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division; “The Boy in the Black Suit,” by Jason Reynolds and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, and “X: A Novel,” by Ilyasah Shabazz with Kekla Magoon and published by Candlewick Press.


Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:
“Trombone Shorty,” illustrated by Bryan Collier, is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book was written by Troy Andrews and Bill Taylor and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.
Two King Illustrator Honor Books were selected: “The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore,” illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, written by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and published by Carolrhoda Books, a division of Lerner Publishing Group, Inc. and “Last Stop on Market Street,” illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Matt de la Peña and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group USA.


Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award:
“Hoodoo,” written by Ronald L. Smith, is the Steptoe author award winner. The book is published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award:
“Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement,” illustrated by Ekua Holmes, is the Steptoe illustrator award winner. The book is written by Carole Boston Weatherford and published by Candlewick Press.


Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement:
Jerry Pinkney is the winner of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton.
Jerry Pinkney’s illustrations detail a world that resonates with readers long after the pages of a book have been turned. His five decades of work offer compelling artistic insights into the legacy of African American storytelling and experience. Beyond Pinkney’s technical brilliance, his support of differentiated learning through art and of young illustrators sets him apart as both artist and educator. His powerful illustrations have redefined the scope of the sophisticated picture book and its use with multiple levels of learners.
Pinkney is a NEW JERSEY author!

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults:
“Bone Gap,” written by Laura Ruby, is the 2016 Printz Award winner. The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
Two Printz Honor Books also were named: “Out of Darkness,” by Ashley Hope Pérez and published by Carolrhoda Lab™, an imprint of Carolrhoda Books, a division of Lerner Publishing Group, and “The Ghosts of Heaven,” by Marcus Sedgwick and published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:
“Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah,” written by Laurie Ann Thompson, illustrated by Sean Qualls and published by Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, New York, wins the award for children ages 0 to 10.
“Fish in a Tree,” written by Lynda Mullaly Hunt and published by Penguin Group, Nancy Paulsen Books, and “The War that Saved My Life,” by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, are the winners of the middle-school (ages 11-13).
The teen (ages 13-18) award winner is “The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B,” written by Teresa Toten and published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, New York.


Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences:
“All Involved,” by Ryan Gattis, published by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
“Between the World and Me,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, published by Spiegel & Grau, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.
“Bones & All,” by Camille DeAngelis, published by St. Martin’s Press.
“Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits,” by David Wong, published by Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press.
“Girl at War,” by Sara Nović, published by Random House, an imprint and division of Penguin Random House LLC.
“Half the World,” by Joe Abercrombie, published by Del Rey, an imprint of Random House, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company.
“Humans of New York: Stories,” by Brandon Stanton, published by St. Martin’s Press.
“Sacred Heart,” by Liz Suburbia, published by Fantagraphics Books Inc.
“Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League,” by Dan-el Padilla Peralta, published by Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
“The Unraveling of Mercy Louis,” by Keija Parssinen, published by Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.


Andrew Carnegie Medal for excellence in children’s video:
Weston Woods Studios, Inc., producer of “That Is NOT a Good Idea,” is the Carnegie Medal winner. In an innovative adaptation of this read-aloud favorite, Goose accepts an invitation to accompany Fox on a simple stroll – or is it? Watch along with a comical chorus of goslings as they react to this cautionary tale.


Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.
The 2016 winner is Jerry Pinkney, whose award-winning works include “The Lion and the Mouse,” recipient of the Caldecott Award in 2010. In addition, Pinkney has received five Caldecott Honor Awards, five Coretta Scott King Illustrator Awards, and four Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honors. Pinkney is a NEW JERSEY author!

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults:
David Levithan is the 2016 Edwards Award winner. His books include: “The Realm of Possibility,” “Boy Meets Boy,” “Love is the Higher Law,” “How They Met, and Other Stories,” “Wide Awake” and “Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist,” all published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.
Levithan is a NEW JERSEY author!

May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award recognizing an author, critic, librarian, historian or teacher of children’s literature, who then presents a lecture at a winning host site.
Jacqueline Woodson will deliver the 2017 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Woodson is the 2014 National Book Award winner for her New York Times bestselling memoir, “Brown Girl Dreaming.” The author of more than two dozen books for young readers, she is a four-time Newbery Honor winner, a recipient of the NAACP Image Award, a two-time Coretta Scott King Award winner and was recently named the Young People’s Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation.


Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book translated from a foreign language and subsequently published in the United States:
“The Wonderful Fluffy Little Squishy” is the 2016 Batchelder Award winner. Originally published in French in 2014 as “Le merveilleux Dodu-Velu-Petit,” the book was written and illustrated by Beatrice Alemagna, translated by Claudia Zoe Bedrick and published by Enchanted Lion Books.
Three Batchelder Honor Books also were selected: “Adam and Thomas,” published by Seven Stories Press, written by Aharon Appelfeld, iIllustrated by Philippe Dumas and translated from the Hebrew by Jeffrey M. Green; “Grandma Lives in a Perfume Village,” published by NorthSouth Books, an imprint of Nordsüd Verlag AG, written by Fang Suzhen, illustrated by Sonja Danowski and translated from the Chinese by Huang Xiumin; and “Written and Drawn by Henrietta,” published by TOON Books, an imprint of RAW Junior, LLC and written, illustrated and translated from the Spanish by Liniers.


Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States:
“The War that Saved My Life,” produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, is the 2016 Odyssey Award winner. The book is written by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and narrated by Jayne Entwistle.
One Odyssey Honor Recording also was selected: “Echo,” produced by Scholastic Audio/Paul R. Gagne, written by Pam Muñoz Ryan and narrated by Mark Bramhall, David de Vries, MacLeod Andrews and Rebecca Soler.


Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Award honoring a Latino writer and illustrator whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:
“The Drum Dream Girl,”(Juv.E585d) illustrated by Rafael López, is the Belpré Illustrator Award winner. The book was written by Margarita Engle and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
Three Belpré Illustrator Honor Books for illustration were selected: “My Tata’s Remedies = Los remedios de mi tata,” illustrated by Antonio Castro L., written by Roni Capin Rivera-Ashford and published by Cinco Puntos Press; “Mango, Abuela, and Me,” illustrated by Angela Dominguez, written by Meg Medina and published by Candlewick Press: and “Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras,” illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.


Pura Belpré (Author) Award:
“Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir,” written by Margarita Engle, is the Belpré Author Award winner. The book is published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.
Two Belpré Author Honor Books were named: “The Smoking Mirror,” written by David Bowles and published by IFWG Publishing, Inc.; and “Mango, Abuela, and Me,” written by Meg Medina, illustrated by Angela Dominguez and published by Candlewick Press.


Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:
“Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras,” written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh, is the Sibert Award winner. The book is published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.
Four Sibert Honor Books were named: “Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans,” written and illustrated by Don Brown and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; “The Boys Who Challenged Hitler: Knud Pedersen and the Churchill Club,” by Phillip Hoose and published by Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers; “Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March,” written by Lynda Blackmon Lowery as told to Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley, illustrated by PJ Loughran and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; and “Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement,” written by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Ekua Holmes and published by Candlewick Press.


Stonewall Book Award - Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience:
“George,” written by Alex Gino and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., and “The Porcupine of Truth,” written by Bill Konigsberg and published by Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., are the winners of the 2016 Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Literature Awards respectively.
Two honor books were selected: “Wonders of the Invisible World,” written by Christopher Barzak and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC; and “Sex is a Funny Word: A Book about Bodies, Feelings, and YOU,” written by Cory Silverberg and Fiona Smyth, illustrated by Fiona Smyth and published by Seven Stories Press.


Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book:
“Don’t Throw It to Mo!,” written by David A. Adler and illustrated by Sam Ricks is the Seuss Award winner. The book is published by Penguin Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA), LLC.
Three Geisel Honor Books were named: “A Pig, a Fox, and a Box,” written and illustrated by Jonathan Fenske and published by Penguin Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; “Supertruck,” written and illustrated by Stephen Savage and published by A Neal Porter Book published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership; and “Waiting,” written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes and published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.


William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens:
“Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda,” written by Becky Albertalli is the 2016 Morris Award winner. The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publisher.
Four other books were finalists for the award: “Because You’ll Never Meet Me,” written by Leah Thomas and published by Bloomsbury Children’s Books; “Conviction,” written by Kelly Loy Gilbert and published by Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group; “The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly,” written by Stephanie Oakes and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers; and “The Weight of Feathers,” written by Anna-Marie McLemore and published by Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press.



YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults:
“Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War,” written by Steve Sheinkin, is the 2016 Excellence winner. The book is published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan’s Children’s Publishing Group.
Four other books were finalists for the award: “Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir,” written by Margarita Engle and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing; “First Flight Around the World: The Adventures of the American Fliers Who Won the Race,” written by Tim Grove and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS; “Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad,” written by M.T. Anderson and published by Candlewick Press; and “This Strange Wilderness: The Life and Art of John James Audubon,” written by Nancy Plain and published by University of Nebraska Press.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Very Hungry Caterpillar comes to Off Broadway 1/30/16















According to Broadway World at http://www.broadwayworld.com/off-broadway/article/Eric-Carles-Books-Head-Off-Broadway-in-THE-VERY-HUNGRY-CATERPILLAR-SHOW-This-Winter-20151123

Acclaimed children's author and illustrator, Eric Carle has delighted three generations of readers with his books featuring his distinctive collage art and iconic characters. His most famous book THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR which was first published in 1969, has sold more than 41 million copies worldwide. THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR SHOW will begin performances on January 30, and will celebrate its opening on Sunday, February 7, with an initial run through March 27, 2016 at the 47th Street Theatre (304 W 47th St.).

This January, Jonathan Rockefeller's critically acclaimed production of THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR SHOW will get its US premiere.

THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR SHOW, features a menagerie of 75 enchanting puppets during a magical 60-minute show that faithfully adapts four of Eric Carle's beloved books for the stage: The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, Mister Seahorse, The Very Lonely Firefly and, of course, THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR.

David Levithan and E.R. Frank at Montclair Public Library 12/6/15

PL Open Book/Open Mind: The Edge of YA Fiction






The Edge of YA Fiction
David Levithan and E.R. Frank in Conversation with Kristen Kemp
Tonight’s guests have been in the vanguard of young adult fiction for decades, because they are experimental and uncompromising artists.
David Levithan, the author of more than 20 young adult novels, is an innovator of form and writer known for his strong gay male characters in books that include Boy Meets Boy and The Tiny Cooper Story.  His most recent novel is Another Day.
E.R. Frank is the author of five novels, most recently Dime.  Dime is a tale of child-trafficking set in in Newark, NJ, which booklist calls “a masterfully told, unforgettable tale of what hope looks like in desperate circumstances.”
They discuss their processes and opinions about fiction for young people with seasoned Y.A. author and Parents magazine book columnist Kristen Kemp. Due to the subject matter of Dime, this event is recommended for readers 14 and up.
FIRST 100 SEATS BY RESERVATION. REMAINING SEATS FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.


Sponsored by Diana Lunin & Susan and Thomas Dunn
Event date: 
Sunday, December 6, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Event address: 
Montclair Public Library
50 S. Fullerton Ave.
Montclair, NJ 07042